Company Name - Company Message
RSS Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

Pesach Season Prayer For Dew
Reflections on Passover Morning 2017
Happy Chanukah Shabbat!
Just One Shabbat Can Change The World!
Temple Tiles for our Times

Categories

Australian Jews
Becoming Divine
Chabura
Challah
chatzos
Creation, Sabbath rest
Elul
Emunah
Fair Trade
Free will
Freedom
Friday light
Gratitude
Hanukkah
Holy Temple
Israel
Jerusalem
Jewish
Jews For The Preservation of Firearms Ownership
JPFO
Kabbalah
Light, Chanukah
Messiah
Miriam
Mishkan
Omer
Passover, Pesach
Prayer
Psalms, King David
Purim
Rabbi Nivin
Rosh Chodesh
Rosh Hashana
Shabbat On My Own
Shabbat, Shabbos, Sabbath
Shabbos music
Shabbos recipes
Shalom Bayit
Sober Seder
Soul
Spiritual growth
Spiritual worlds
Succos, Sukkot
Thanksgivvukah
Tikkun olam
Women of the Wall
Yeud Tikkun
Yirat Hashem
Yom Kippur
powered by

Shabbos Chic Blog

Holy Temple

Temple Tiles for our Times

I am so excited to share my little artistic rendering of Linda Gradstein's pro photo and article on TheMediaLine.org

This is a restored tile from the second Temple in Jerusalem, created by archaeologists from their actual discoveries. It's ancient Jewish patchwork flooring and I love it!  In my soul this design is so familiar and so satisfying... and now I know why.

Gradstein reports, "...about 600 colored stone floor tile segments have so far been uncovered, with more than 100 definitively dated to the Herodian Second Temple period. The style of flooring is the same as those found in other of Herod’s palaces in Masada, Herodian and Jericho. Snyder says the tile segments were perfectly inlaid next to each other.

"The tiles are part of the Temple Mount sifting project, an Israeli archaeological project begun in 2005."

May we all be so blessed to see the final Temple in person someday soon!

Shevii Shel Pesach 5775


It's Spring, And It's Parshas Vayikra

This week we begin the book of Vayikra, with the Torah portion of the same name.

It's about sacrifices, and that's something very foreign to us today, unless we look at it spiritually.

Rabbi Akiva Tatz provided a little booklet for those of us in his weekly class through Jewish Workshops, and he wrote: "If there is no difficulty, there is no sacrifice." That is another way to look at the whole concept of sacrifice, very different from the Temple sacrifices in the past.

The difficulties in our lives (and we all have PLENTY of them) are our opportunities for sacrifice. We can choose to see them as a way to give up our selfishness and small view of ourselves and of the world (which of course includes other people), and in that choice we are sacrificing other viewpoints.

Choosing a higher view and following through with higher actions is making a sacrifice of everything we are not thinking and not doing instead.

I am thinking and posting about sacrifice this Shabbos, and will undoubtedly be wrestling with the concept the rest of my life!

The Golden Gate in Jerusalem for us all

The Golden Gate is on the east side of the wall around the old city of Jerusalem, and leads directly to the Temple Mount. It is the source of rich history, some of it rather speculative in nature.

But more importantly, it might possibly be the source point of our very rich future in Messiah. So, maybe these photos I post today will unite and ignite our attention on this important spot on earth right now. Can't hurt, can it?

As one blogger named Shalom Ben Issac writes, "Jews believe that the Mashiach (Messiah) will enter Jerusalem from the east through the Golden Gate and as he enters the Temple Mount he'll bring redemption to the Hebrew nation."

Naturally, Christians and Muslims have their own differing theories. Looks like we will all be watching what happens there soon enough.

Good week to listen to this talk on Forgiveness in Marriage

On her blog today, Shuli Kleinman shared the most wonderful, chabura talk by Rabbi Yaakov Zalman Labinsky called Forgiveness in Marriage.

Wow, what a timely topic! I'm pretty sure this is not a coincidence in my life... "The first years of marriage are for healing each others' souls."  Thank you, Shuli for your vigilant sharing of this deep teaching.

And now, a little further from Home Sweet Home in Texas, we have JERUSALEM, the IMAX 3-D movie. Another WOW for sure! I can't wait to see it soon.






Ushpizin - Succos Guests in My Spiritual Life

In our EmunaHealing class this week, Rebbetzin Chana Bracha Siegelbaum helped us understand that our Succah is representative of the Holy Temple.

We build it and we spend a designated time in it each year in order to remember and connect  with the past and future Temple, right where we live, right now.

And, no matter where we live, we can expect a special guest to visit us each day.  Our spiritual Succos guests are the Patriarchs of our faith, and they are here for us now if we are willing to receive them.

The Aramaic word for "guests" is pronounced Ushpizin, and that is what we call our special Succos guests each year.


Rebbetzin Chana Bracha shared the basic spiritual qualities represented by each of the Patriarchs, and also associated the particular Sephirot to this list I'm quoting from an Aish.com post by Rabbi Joel Padowitz as well:

  • Abraham represents love and kindness [Chessed]
  • Isaac represents restraint and personal strength [Gevurah]
  • Jacob represents beauty and truth [Tiferet]
  • Moses represents eternality and dominance through Torah [Netzach]
  • Aaron represents empathy and receptivity to divine splendor [Hod]
  • Joseph represents holiness and the spiritual foundation [Yesod]
  • David represents the establishment of the kingdom of Heaven on Earth [Malchut]

As an EmunaHealer, Rebbetzin included her understanding of the various parts of the human body represented by each of the Sephirot. 

Her sharing added another tangible, significant layer of understanding and possibility of healing  to the holiday of Succos for me this year.

See Rebbetzin Chana Bracha Siegelbaum's
Kosher Tube 3-part teaching on 
Torah of the Mothers

Jerusalem Gold 2013 and My Spiritual Treasure

Last week,  the Times of Israel posted Ilan Ben Zion's report of a real-life treasure trove of ancient gold discovered by archeologist Eliat Mazar.

"The find, unearthed in the area adjacent to the Southern Wall of the Temple Mount known as the Ophel, was dated to the early 7th century CE, in all likelihood the time of the brief Persian conquest of Jerusalem."

Mazar speculates that, "the hoard of gold and silver objects, found beneath the floor of a Byzantine-era house meters from the massive walls of the Temple Mount, was brought by Jews who returned to the city after the Persians conquered it from the Byzantines in 614 CE."

While reading about the Jerusalem treasure today, I found myself thinking about our Yom Kippur service yesterday. There were not very many people gathered in our little Temple to pray.

Apparently  many Jews do not treasure Yom Kippur as I do.

Now, this is not a comment about what other people should do on Yom Kippur, or how it should be done correctly. I am simply stating that Yom Kippur is true treasure to me in my life.

My annual opportunity to seek and find spiritual treasure during the whole month of Elul, on Rosh Hashana, during the 10 Days of Awe and of course on Yom Kippur is beyond monetary valuation. It is priceless. And I find it over and over, regularly, without fail.

I can count on finding spiritual treasure because it's already scheduled for me. It's right on my calendar every year!

Maybe the comparison between a fortune in ancient gold coins recently found near the Temple Mount and the value I place on the High Holy Days is politically incorrect in this world right now.

Mercifully, it's not this world that matters in the long run, other than seeing and knowing it as preparation for the World To Come.

To me, Yom Kippur is for Preppers of the World To Come!

And what could be more exciting than that? Well, possibly Succot, the Season of Joy that will soon be upon us. It starts this Wednesday evening, September 18th.

I love this quote from my JewishAmerica.com email today:

"Those who don’t stop growing come to happiness from being Jewish and from realizing a connection to One who is focused on giving us every opportunity to become great in ways we can’t imagine."

See Rita Brownstein's adorable DIY Sukkah lights and make some for yourself this year.

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis at the Wall this Elul

Women praying at the Wall during Elul include Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis of the dynamic Jewish outreach organization,  www.Hineni.org and her timeless, infectious love and respect for all things Jewish.  She posted a poignant article about Weeping For Jerusalem on her blog while visiting Jerusalem recently:

"For thousands of years we prayed, wept and hoped for Yerushalayim. To see Yerushalayim again, to behold the rebuilt Beis HaMikdash, has always been the center of all our prayers...

Should we not ask again and again and still again, “Where is the Beis HaMikdash?” I miss it so. I’m in Jerusalem but the shinning crown of the Holy City is absent and my joy cannot be complete until I see its glory restored."

"This Rosh Hashanah has to be different. It just cannot  be another Rosh Hashanah. It has to be different.

You and I, we could bring redemption to our people.

So, how do we do it?  First, we have to find out who we are, what we are, what we represent...

Every person, every individual is a special, unique creation of God. We are not mass-produced.

God created each and every one of us, custom-made, with a unique purpose.

Before we are ever born, Hashem makes a magnificent portrait of us, and it's hanging in the Heavenly galleries. And it portrays that which Hashem hopes that which we will achieve in this world...

So, this year we have to make a difference, we MUST make a difference, for ourselves, for our families, for Am Israel and for the world."

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis, fromA Nation Blessed As One

Contemplating Parashat Kitavo - First Things First

It isn't just the first fruits of the land we contemplate this Shabbos reading Parashat Kitavo... no, it's our first thoughts and actions each day.

Rebbetzin Chana Brach Siegelbaum posts the following on her Women At The Crossroads blog this week:

"Knowing that the holy Torah is eternal; as we learn from the Thirteen Principles of Belief: “This Torah will never be exchanged;”* then, how do we fulfill the mitzvah of Bikurim today when we have neither a worshipping  Kohen, nor a Temple, or an altar?

Even today we can fulfill the mitzvah of Bikurim by dedicating the beginning of every matter to Hashem. The body follows the head."

* Rambam, the Thirteen Principles of Emunah, #9.

Restoring the Jewish Glory

Three bits of wisdom from Rabbi Yitzchak Schwartz and his YouTube video


...the goal of the Divine bridge traits referred to as the Sefirot, are to infinitize all processes and all structures, [including those of our own persona]...
 
...the goal of the Tikun [rectification] of cosmic brokenness, is to transform reality into a conduit and conductor and environment for infinity...
 
... the goal of all upper and lower  world interpersonal relationships is to tap into each other's infinite wellsprings and thereby unify with each other, and thereby reproduce infinite shefa [abundance] for all of the world to be nurtured from...

Dr . Yedidah Cohen on Tisha B'Av

The incomprehensible day of loss and mourning was put into perspective for me today when I received the following in an email from Dr. Yedidah Cohen, translator of the works of Rabbi Yehuda Ashlag and others:

"Where is God? Why can’t I sense His presence?

Rabbi Ashlag teaches that we can’t sense God’s presence because we have put a rival in His place, we have placed our ego at the center of our focus and God is left in a corner.

Yet we are commanded to build Him a sanctuary, and then He will dwell within us. A sanctuary in our heart, making God a living presence in our lives. Then the outer sanctuary will be rebuilt."   Dr. Yedidah Cohen

Amen and yet again, Amen.

Shabbat of Vision


"...this Shabbat is called "Shabbat Chazon" after the first word of the book of Isaiah which is the Haftorah for this Shabbat.

Chazon means 'vision' or 'seeing'.

This Shabbat, if observed with joy and concentration, maximizes the possibility
for unity with G-d.

One may benefit from this state of unity and be granted an opportunity for unique and penetrating vision into not only his personal spiritual status, but also into that of the entirety of the Jewish people as well." 


"Shabbat is a special day when our inherent eternal connection with Hashem is activated. There is never any mourning on Shabbat. On Shabbat we all rise up from mourning to delight in eating, drinking, festive clothes and new fruits. Therefore, the Shabbat preceding the 9th of Av is especially suitable for the kind of repentance of 'doing good' through visualizing the Temple. The purpose of the vision is not just to comfort us, but to inspire us and elevate us to turn the vision of the Third Temple into physical reality."

Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint